Santra Hybrid Plants

Santra

 Although Citrus is a subtropical genus, northern gardeners can grow lemons, oranges, and other citrus trees in containers to enjoy fresh fruit. Standard-size orange andgrapefruit trees can grow 18 to 22 feet tall, whereas dwarf varieties only grow 8 to 12 feet tall. Most citrus varieties are self-fertile, so only one tree is necessary. On average, fruit bearing begins when the trees are between 3 and 6 years old;

₹799.00
Tax included
Quantity In Stock

SKU00251
  • Security policy visit http://nurserynature.com/content/10-security-policy Security policy visit http://nurserynature.com/content/10-security-policy
  • Shipping & Delivery Policy visit http://nurserynature.com/content/1-delivery Shipping & Delivery Policy visit http://nurserynature.com/content/1-delivery
  •  Cancellation & Refund Policy visit  http://nurserynature.com/content/6-aeu-legal-revocation-terms Cancellation & Refund Policy visit http://nurserynature.com/content/6-aeu-legal-revocation-terms

Santra

 Although Citrus is a subtropical genus, northern gardeners can grow lemons, oranges, and other citrus trees in containers to enjoy fresh fruit. Standard-size orange andgrapefruit trees can grow 18 to 22 feet tall, whereas dwarf varieties only grow 8 to 12 feet tall. Most citrus varieties are self-fertile, so only one tree is necessary. On average, fruit bearing begins when the trees are between 3 and 6 years old;

Santra

Planting & Care

PLANTING

  • Citrus trees should be planted in a sunny and wind-protected area.

  • In the citrus belt, trees can be planted at any time, however, spring is the best time for container grown plants.

  • Standard-size trees should be spaced 12 to 25 feet apart and dwarf trees should be set 6 to 10 feet apart. The exact distance depends on the variety. The bigger the fruit, the farther the distance.

  • If the soil is not well-drained, plant the trees on a slight mound to prevent waterlogging.

  • To plant citrus trees inside from seeds, remove the seeds from the desired fruit. Soak the seeds overnight in water and plant them ½ inch deep in moist potting soil. Cover the pot with a plastic bag or wrap and let it sit in a warm and sunny spot for a few weeks until the seeds start to grow. Then, remove the plastic but keep the pot near a warm and sunny window.

CARE

  • A few weeks after planting, and for the first few years (before bearing age), feed the tree a balanced (such as 6-6-6) fertilizer.

  • For newly bearing trees, provide nutrients to continue branch and leaf growth but also to replace nutrients lost by fruit forming. A citrus blend is ideal.

  • Check manufacturer’s directions, or ask a garden nursery, as to how often and how much to apply during each year of a tree’s growth.

  • Mulches are not recommended for citrus trees, but if trees are located in a cultivated plant bed where mulch is used, keep at least 12 inches of bare ground between the tree trunk and the mulch. Pre-emergent herbicides may be used to prevent weed seeds from germinating.

  • Fruit thinning is unnecessary.

PESTS/DISEASES

  • Aphids

  • Spider Mites

  • Root and Crown Rots

  • Fungal Leaf Spots

  • Fruit Flies

  • Tristeza Virus spread by Aphids

SKU00251

Data sheet

Height
)5 ft to 8 ft